Section Divider Section Divider

Archive for the ‘home made cleaning products’ Category

It’s time to polish the silver

The holiday season is upon us, and it’s tradion to use the good china once a year at Christmas. This also means polishing the silver if you haven’t sold it already. With silver hovering around$37 an ounce it’s a thought, and just think you’d never have to polish it again. I can remember my mom spending hours polishing the silver in anticipation of the big Christmas dinner. I can make it a lttle easier for you with a good home made cleaning solution. I’m also going to share another way of polishing the silver using a fantastic commercial product. This way is for the folks who want to short cut, and have truly gleaming silver. First the home made solution. I want you to line a large baking dish or your kitchen sink with aluminum foil. Fill with hot steaming water, add two tablespoons of baking soda, and two tablespoons of salt. Place your silver in the solution so it’s touching. You’ll be able to see the tarnish coming off. When you remove your silver buff with a dry rag. Now for the folks like me who want to cheat, and have really gleaming silver. I recommend using Porters Friend Silver Polish or a product called Flitz. I’ve had great luck with both. Watch a short video of the process by clicking here. Before using the silver on the big day I’d give it a quick run through the dishwasher to remove any polish residue on the silver. If you’re storing your silver after polishing it will maintain a shine for up to six months.

Share

How to eliminate germs in your home

Did you know your toilet may have less harmful bacteria than your kitchen sink. Food particles left on plates to soak, or rinsed off the plates become a fertile breeding ground for bacteria. Having a garbage disposal gives those crumbs, and pieces of food an area to become lodged. Your drain plug at the bottom of the sink is a favorite repository for unwanted critters. If you use your sink to prepare ground beef or poultry salmonella and ecoli is often present. If you think about it we normally just rinse the sink when we’re done using it. We normally clean our toilets with a bowl cleaner that’s also a disinfectant. It’s no big surprise your kitchen sink could be harboring some nasty  germs. You can remedy this situation by cleaning your sink thoroughly with hot soapy water after each use. In addition a bleach, and water mixture, or a disinfectant diluted will kill any germs lurking in your garbage disposal. Lastly don’t forget to wash your drain plug, and drain at the bottom of the sink.

Share

Easy ways to eliminate unpleasant odors

I’m going to share some great idea’s that have been around a long time to eliminate unpleasant odors at home. A stinky garbage disposal can be fixed by feeding it lemon, or lime rinds. A odorous pair of sneakers can be made fresh by inserting a dryer sheet in each shoe. Wet sneakers can be dried rapidly, and kept stink free by shoving balled up newspapers into the shoes. Use your old coffee grounds to absorb odors in you refrigerator. Spread the used wet coffee grounds on a baking sheet, and dry in the oven on warm. Gather into a bowl, and put in your fridge. Cat litter can be freshened by adding used dried tea leaves to the cat litter. Lastly open your windows, and let the sun shine in. Sunlight, and fresh air works wonders on making your house smell wonderful.

Share

Clean your microwave without chemicals

If you have a husband or kids like mine you’ll inevitably find your microwave with exploded food residue coating the inside. Everyone in our family knows to cover the food you’re trying to heat with a paper towel. It always amazes me how they forget. I picked up a great tip on cleaning the microwave, and I’d like to pass it on. Take four cups of water in a bowl with one whole lemon cut in half, and heat in your microwave on high for five minutes. Don’t bother covering it because this is one time you want it to coat the inside of your microwave. When the timer goes off be careful when you remove the bowl because the water will be very hot. Get a rag or paper towels and wipe out the inside of the microwave. If you have something really stubborn you can dip your rag into the hot lemon water, and it should take it right off. The reason this works so well is you’re creating steam in the microwave, and the lemon contains citrus oils now used in many cleaning chemicals. I hope this information helps you.

                                                                                                                                                        Aunt Patti

Share

Using salt to remove pet urine in carpet

I recently learned one of the major network morning shows featured a guest who recommended cleaning pet urine out of carpet with salt. The recommendation was to dump salt on the pet urine then vacuum it up with your vacuum. I don’t know where people get these crazy ideas. The saddest part of the story is a major television show would give someone a platform to spread this nonsense. First of all salt will not remove urine from carpet. The urine will soak down into the backing of the carpet, and provide a new favorite place for your pet to pee. You have to use a spot remover designed to remove pet stains, blot the stain out of the carpet, and continue this process until it’s out. Use a pet stain remover with an enzyme added to address any residual urine that ends up in the pad.

Lastly if you use your vacuum to suck up pet urine you stand a good chance of ruining your vacuum. Think about the urine you pick up being circulated through all the moving parts of your vacuum. Now imagine what the exhaust will smell like every time you turn the machine on. What do you think happens to the metal parts coming into contact with wet salt and urine. Rust, and corrosion is the answer. Also if you ever read your owners manual it says do not vacuum up wet with your vacuum as a danger of electrocution may occur. Mixing electricity, and moisture isn’t a good idea unless you’re using a wet/dry vacuum. Aunt Patti had to address this crazy recommendation. I’ve been in the business of cleaning almost my entire life, and I’m still amazed at the crazy things people will try. If you want real professional solutions to your cleaning problems visit my web site at www.askauntpatti.com

                                        Aunt Patti

Share

The Myth and Mystery of Home Made Cleaning Products

I’d like to discuss the use of bleach as a cleaning product. I’ve had many people tell me they use it to clean. I’m going to explain what bleach will do, and what it won’t do. First of all bleach is an oxidizing agent. It’s most commonly used in laundry to brighten your whites. When used in the laundry, detergent is still added to the load along with the bleach. The reason for this is detergent cleans, and bleach does not. Bleach has no chemical surfactants to lift dirt from a surface. So all you folks using a bleach , and water solution to clean are not accomplishing much.

Now I’ll share with you some other uses for bleach that do work. First of all bleach can be used as a disinfectant. I believe it’s still officially recognized as such by the Center for Disease Control. Mixed with water and mopped on the floor, or wiped on a surface it will kill a broad range of germs. It looses it effectiveness in water after a short time so you want to use the solution fairly soon. Bleach can be used to eliminate mold, and mildew. Again mix it with water, and apply it to the surface. Just remember mold and mildew occur in dark, damp conditions with little air movement. If you don’t eliminate these conditions it will return. Another way I’ve seen bleach used effectively is in meat room sanitation. After cleaning the meatroom with a good food service degreaser, I’ve known people who use a bleach, and water mixture to sanitize the room.

In closing bleach was designed as an oxidizing agent for use in laundry which it does very well. There are great commercial products available to disinfect, sanitize meat rooms, and kill mold. All of these products will do a better job than bleach. I’d love to hear your feedback on this topic.

                                                   Aunt Patti

Share